Parkland's Balancing Act: Redistricting Plans Unveiled Ahead of 2024 Elections
Parkland City Commission. {Bryan Boggiano}

By Bryan Boggiano

The Parkland City Commission reviewed three proposed city commission redistricting plans at their Sept. 13 meeting that consider current population, population trends, and subdivision consistency.

The charter-mandated redistricting process requires that new districts drawn have no more than a ten-percent population difference between the most-populated and least-populated districts. Currently, the deviation is 11.55 percent.

Parkland Commission Backs New District Plan Reflecting Population Shifts 1
Current Parkland City Commission districts {City of Parkland}

The three proposals, Plans A, B, and C, each had varying configurations. The commission previously reviewed two plans, which ARCBridge prepared, at their Aug. 16 workshop that considered only census data from 2020. They expressed concerns those plans did not account for new developments and population changes since then.

As a result, ARCBridge updated the redistricting plans and provided a new proposal.

According to the new plans, Parkland’s total population is about 37,705, and the ideal district would have a population of 9,676. This is a slight increase from the census-determined 34,670 people and 8,668 per district.

Most of that population growth is from Parkland Bay, Cascata, The Falls at Parkland, and Four Seasons. About half of the 2,835 people added since 2020 come from District 1, including much of western Parkland.

Parkland Commission Backs New District Plan Reflecting Population Shifts 2
Proposed redistricting maps {City of Parkland}

Under Plan A

Four Seasons, Parkland Bay, and Parkland Royale would be moved from District One to District Two. Parkland Isle and Parkland Village would move from District Two to District One.

Parkland Golf and Country Club and Pine Trails Park would move from District Two to District Three. There would be no changes to District Four.

Under Plan B

Four Seasons, Parkland Bay, Parkland Royale, and part of Parkland Village would move from District One to District Two. Parts of Parkland Village and Parkland Isle would move from District Two to District One.

Westglades Middle School and Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School would move from District Three to District One. Cypress Cay, Quigley Park, and Riverglades Elementary would move from District Four to District Three.

Under Plan C

There would be no changes to District One. Westglades and MSD would move from District Three to District Two, while Cypress Cay, Quigley Park, and Riverglades Elementary would move from District Four to District Three.

The population deviation between the least- and most-populated districts in each plan are 8.63, 8.77, and 8.59 percent, respectively.

The commission largely supported Plan A, saying it will not split any neighborhoods or homeowners associations.

Having all of the communities together is, to me, a home run,” said Mayor Rich Walker.

Commissioners Bob Mayersohn and Ken Cutler said this issue was important to them since both represented different parts of Pine Tree Estates at one point. Meeting residents at HOA and community meetings was impossible since it brought Sunshine Law issues into play. Any communication on the topic was restricted to city meetings.

“We couldn’t even talk together about what the challenges were,” Mayersohn said.

Ultimately, Mayersohn moved to approve Plan A. Cutler seconded, and the commission approved the redistricting plan unanimously.

A second reading will occur  on Oct. 4, starting at 7 p.m.

Send your news to Parkland’s #1 Award-Winning News Source, Parkland Talk. Don’t miss reading Tamarac Talk, Coral Springs TalkCoconut Creek Talk, and Margate Talk

Author Profile

Bryan Boggiano
Bryan Boggiano
A University of Florida journalism graduate, Bryan plans to pursue geosciences at Florida International University for his master's. He has a strong interest in weather, entertainment, and journalism.